May
02
2014
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Paolo Nutini in Rome!

nutini

Next July, the young Scottish singer will perform in Rome at the Ippodromo delle Campanelle

Presenting his last album Caustic.

Since his debut in 2006 (only 19 years old) with the album These Streets, Nutini showed his talent all around combining the heritage of soul and folk music , with the most personal and fresh attitude.

Nutini’s Father, Alfredo is of Italian descent, from the Region of Tuscany, and his mother Linda is Scottish. His concert is much attended here in the Eternal City where Paolo has conquered enthusiastic hearts that enjoy his art.

Special Buses will be available for the event, departing from Termini station (around the corner from Yes Hotel) taking the public directly to the spot.

Saturday 19th July 2014

Rock in Roma

At the Ippodromo delle Campanelle

Ticket price is 32 euro

Concert begins at 21.45.

Have fun!

Marcelo

Apr
02
2014
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Frida Khalo at the Scuderia dei Quirinale

Frida_Kahlo_(self_portrait)

An exhibition that explores the whole of her artistic career. Pure masterpieces from public and private collections in Mexico, Europe and the United States. Self depiction is the central theme, with more than forty fabulous portraits, including: Self portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (for the first time in Italy).

Frida is the very symbol of an artistic avant-garde of Mexican culture in the 20th century. Always rebel, her works mix the most important cultural movements of her period: Revolutionary Pauperism, Stridentism, Surrealism and Magical Realism.

The exhibition hosts also works from other artists who were active during the period including of course her husband, Diego Rivera (Portrait of Natasha Gelman, 1943 and Nude, 1930 among others) and also Jose Clemente Orozco, Jose David Alfaro Siqueiros and Maria Izquierdo.

Scuderia dei Quirinale, Via XXIV Maggio, 16 Roma

From 20th March until 31st August 2014

Ticket price: 12 euro

Times:  Su.- Thu 10.00-20.00, Fri- Sat 10.00-22.30 (from 20th March until 13th July)

Su – Thu 16.00-22.00, Fri- Sat 16.00-24.00 (from 14t July until 31st August)

Buses: 40, 60, 64, 70, 117, 170, H)

Metro: B stop Cavour, A stop Barberini.

Marcelo

Oct
23
2013
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Why not Cezanne in Rome?

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Considered a master by Matisse and Picasso, the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism and the early 20th century’s Cubism ,  Paul Cezanne’s immortal legacy will be present in Rome for what is probably one most interesting exhibitions of the Year.

The name of the event is ‘‘Cezanne and the Italian Artists of the twentieth century’’.  It takes place at the Complesso del Vittoriano, just around the corner from Piazza Venezia, at the very heart of the City Centre. Easy to reach from our location with the underground B, stop Colosseo or with the Bus 40, stop Piazza Venezia.

Here follows for you the ticket prices and admission time:

Tickets:

Individuals: 12 euro

Groups: 9 euro

Over 65 years 9 euro

Children under 6 year old free admission

Admission time and dates:

Monday to Thursday from 9:30 to 19:30;
Friday and Saturday from 9.30 to 23.30;
Sundays from 9.30 to 20.30.

The exhibition will be on until February 2nd 2014. Enjoy it !!!!

Apr
01
2013
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Eye in the Sky of Rome

eye in the sky

The Wizard of Sound, Alan Parsons, will perform next 23 th July in Rome at the Foro Italico. No excuses, be there at 9.00 pm, so you will not miss the enchanting atmospheric vibrations of this Master of Rock.

Low profile image, with his almost ‘’shy boy’’ look, focusing all his energies in the invisible inspiring force of sound, Alan Parsons worked with bands like The Beatles and Pink Floyd, helping to give birth to authentic immortal masterpieces.

His band, the Alan Parsons Project, offers a cool and sophisticated vision of rock in all its elegance and philosophical aspirations. Just pure musical Hedonism.  For more information about the Alan Parsons concert or accommodations during July contact us at info@yeshotelrome.com.

MARCELO

Mar
02
2013
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THE SIGN OF THE GLORY

Amore-e-Psiche-di-Canova_650x435

Is the name of the exhibition that takes place in the Museo di Roma from 5th December, 2012 until.7th April 2013. Sketches that gave birth to immortal masterpieces will provide a genuine prospective of the creation process by the great Canova.

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) became famous for bringing back the classical elegance after the fire of baroque style with all its passionate excess cooled down a bit. His solid and graceful marble nudes are vibrant and unquestionably alive, in a radiant white full of splendour.

Opening time from 10.00 until 20.00 from Tuesday to Sunday, admission ticket is 11 euros.. For booking try Infoline: tel. +39 060608 (daily, from 9:00 to 21:00) or visit www.omniticket.it.

Museo di Roma is located in Piazza San Pantaleo, 10 near Piazza Navona. (a 15 minutes bus ride from our location). For more info info@yeshotelrome.com.

MARCELO

Feb
19
2013
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TAXI IN ROME TIPS

taxiroma

By following this simple tips you may have not a story to tell about a taxi driver that has left you with a wallet excessively empty.

Before taking a cab ask our staff about how much a fair price will be for the desired destination,  which helps you to avoid unpleasant situations.

It is true that our hotel is just around the corner from Termini Station, but also half a block from Piazza Indipendenza. The point is that from Termini you pay a supplement of  2 euros more, that you save instead from the stand at Indipendenza square.

There are two airports in Rome: Fiumicino and Ciampino. There is an official rate for taxis which is from our Hotel 48 euros to Fiumicino and 30 euros to Ciampino. This price applies for a maximum of four persons and four bags.

Any trip to the historic centre should show up as Tariffa 1 on the meter. Tariffa 2 applies beyond the Grande Raccordo Annulare and it is charged at a higher rate. Make sure that the driver has set the right Tariffa while traveling to the Roman centre.

Rome taxi drivers prefer to use taxi stands. You might be able to flag a taxi down, but it is a rarer occurence than in most cities. Romans know they’ll find a taxi stand in all the major piazze.

Official cabs are white, have a taxi sign mounted on the roof, have an insignia on the driver’s door reading “Comune di Roma,” have an official number and a meter. You want an official cab. Do not use the touts at Termini Station.

The meter starts at different rates depending on the day and time, as it follows:

Monday –Saturday from 7am- 10pm the meter starts at €2,80

Sundays and Holidays the meter starts at €4,00

Night fares from 10pm-7am, the meter starts at €5,80

Supplement from Termini Station plus 2 euros.

* Each piece of luggage with the following dimensions cost (cm 35×25x50) €1,00 each..

If you feel you have been cheated by a taxi, the driver’s license number is written on a metal plate on the left door on the passenger side. Make sure you get a receipt or ricevuta and write down the name and number printed on the plate. In addition, you should also take note of which cab company you used .With this information, you can file a complaint with the cab company and should be able to receive reimbursement.

And remember that our staff will assist you with all the information you may need. See you soon.

MARCELO

Feb
17
2013
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Villa D’Este, Tivoli

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Popes or their families were involved in making expensive and impressive villas, works of art or monuments for power and family prestige, now these structures account to a great deal of income.

Villa D’Este is no different story, in-fact this is byproduct of Roman Catholic priests’ luxurious and competitive life style.

Pope Julius III elevated Cardinal Ippolito II D’Este, grandson of Pope Alexander VI, to governor of Tivoli (north east of Rome) in 1550.

As a result of his new assignment, the cardinal was given an old monastery. Not satisfied with the new office, Ippolito, called famous architects, engineers and painters of that time to change an unknown monastery to ‘gardening and water-play model’ across Europe.

In the process, Villa Adriana marbles and statues were dismantled by the orders of the cardinal to making his own villa better.

The late-Renaissance villa stayed on D’Este family until the 18th C. when Maria Beatrice (daughter of Ercole II D’Este) married Duke Ferdinand of Habsburg, and automatically the villa became a Habsburg property.

As other Roman villas fate, the D’Este fell in disrepair and was neglected till the Italian State bought and restored it after the end of first world war. It is now open to the public

Villa D’Este became UNESCO world Heritage Site in 2001.
Adu K

Jan
17
2013
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When Visiting Italy (some common mistakes)

italia1

Every country is different, here are some tips that will help you to have a more enjoyable experience in Italy:

  • Assuming you can buy tickets for public transportation directly on the bus / tram.

Most big cities in Italy (Rome, Milan, Naples, Florence) require you to buy your bus/tram tickets before boarding. And not just that, but most bus stops will not have a ticket machine next to the stop. Rather, you’ll need to find a newspaper stand (edicola) or a tobacco shop (tabaccaio) to purchase your tickets.

  • No validating train tickets

Depending on the type of train ticket you buy, you may need to validate it or otherwise you pay a fine. This will be indicated on the ticket.

  • Assuming that cars and scooters will leave you to go first while crossing the streets

Even when they are bounded to, many drivers will not stop to let you go first and scooters will never do it (they have no obligation).

  • Expecting to be waited on very attentively in a restaurant or store.

Many restaurants will be “understaffed,” (few waiters working many tables) They probably won’t ask “how are you folks doing?”, if you like the food, if you want a refill (this concept doesn’t exist) or other general “friendly” requests that are in reality superfluous to your main dining experience – they just don’t have the time. So, sit back, be patient, and flag down your waiter when you need something, but be patient in knowing they are probably working very hard.

  • Tipping.

You don’t need to tip in Italy. Italians will only leave a tip for exceptional service (anniversary dinner in a Michelin-starred restaurant) or will leave the change when paying cash because it’s easier not to wait for the waiter to make change .

  • Thinking you have to order an antipasto, primo e secondo at every meal.

Most Italians don’t eat an antipasto, primo, secondo and dolce at every meal – you don’t have to, either.

  • Not respecting meal times, especially at lunch time.

Most restaurants and bars have specific opening times, and they will close in the afternoon. If you have a late breakfast, visit museums through lunch and hope to get a bite to eat at 2pm or 3pm, you’re going to find a very limited selection.

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  • Ordering before paying, paying before ordering in a bar.

Many bars require that you get a receipt (scontrino) before ordering, especially if you see the cash register (cassa) sitting apart from where you’ll pick up the food or coffee, and you don’t see immediate table service.

  • Touching fruit & vegetables with your bare hands in a street market or supermarket.

In a supermarket you should see plastic gloves and bags near the scales or throughout the fruit/veg section. Use them. In an open-air market, you won’t see these gloves because you are not expected to handle anything yourself – the people working in the stall will do everything.

Our staff will kindly help you to learn all that you need about Italian culture. See you around!

Marcelo

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