May
17
2013
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The Azaleas of the Spanish Steps

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Living in Rome is full of small joys and one of our favorites is to see the city bloom in April, as if waking up from its winter sleep.

The ritual sign that let you know officialy that spring has arrived are the Azaleas of the Spanish Steps. Every year for the last 75 years the staircase is decorated towards the end of April with flowers that contribute to the feeling of joy that pervades the city when winter is left behind.

To experience Rome during Spring, check our website to book you accommodation or send us a line: we’ll find an option that fits your budget!

Feb
19
2013
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TAXI IN ROME TIPS

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By following this simple tips you may have not a story to tell about a taxi driver that has left you with a wallet excessively empty.

Before taking a cab ask our staff about how much a fair price will be for the desired destination,  which helps you to avoid unpleasant situations.

It is true that our hotel is just around the corner from Termini Station, but also half a block from Piazza Indipendenza. The point is that from Termini you pay a supplement of  2 euros more, that you save instead from the stand at Indipendenza square.

There are two airports in Rome: Fiumicino and Ciampino. There is an official rate for taxis which is from our Hotel 48 euros to Fiumicino and 30 euros to Ciampino. This price applies for a maximum of four persons and four bags.

Any trip to the historic centre should show up as Tariffa 1 on the meter. Tariffa 2 applies beyond the Grande Raccordo Annulare and it is charged at a higher rate. Make sure that the driver has set the right Tariffa while traveling to the Roman centre.

Rome taxi drivers prefer to use taxi stands. You might be able to flag a taxi down, but it is a rarer occurence than in most cities. Romans know they’ll find a taxi stand in all the major piazze.

Official cabs are white, have a taxi sign mounted on the roof, have an insignia on the driver’s door reading “Comune di Roma,” have an official number and a meter. You want an official cab. Do not use the touts at Termini Station.

The meter starts at different rates depending on the day and time, as it follows:

Monday –Saturday from 7am- 10pm the meter starts at €2,80

Sundays and Holidays the meter starts at €4,00

Night fares from 10pm-7am, the meter starts at €5,80

Supplement from Termini Station plus 2 euros.

* Each piece of luggage with the following dimensions cost (cm 35×25x50) €1,00 each..

If you feel you have been cheated by a taxi, the driver’s license number is written on a metal plate on the left door on the passenger side. Make sure you get a receipt or ricevuta and write down the name and number printed on the plate. In addition, you should also take note of which cab company you used .With this information, you can file a complaint with the cab company and should be able to receive reimbursement.

And remember that our staff will assist you with all the information you may need. See you soon.

MARCELO

Jan
17
2013
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When Visiting Italy (some common mistakes)

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Every country is different, here are some tips that will help you to have a more enjoyable experience in Italy:

  • Assuming you can buy tickets for public transportation directly on the bus / tram.

Most big cities in Italy (Rome, Milan, Naples, Florence) require you to buy your bus/tram tickets before boarding. And not just that, but most bus stops will not have a ticket machine next to the stop. Rather, you’ll need to find a newspaper stand (edicola) or a tobacco shop (tabaccaio) to purchase your tickets.

  • No validating train tickets

Depending on the type of train ticket you buy, you may need to validate it or otherwise you pay a fine. This will be indicated on the ticket.

  • Assuming that cars and scooters will leave you to go first while crossing the streets

Even when they are bounded to, many drivers will not stop to let you go first and scooters will never do it (they have no obligation).

  • Expecting to be waited on very attentively in a restaurant or store.

Many restaurants will be “understaffed,” (few waiters working many tables) They probably won’t ask “how are you folks doing?”, if you like the food, if you want a refill (this concept doesn’t exist) or other general “friendly” requests that are in reality superfluous to your main dining experience – they just don’t have the time. So, sit back, be patient, and flag down your waiter when you need something, but be patient in knowing they are probably working very hard.

  • Tipping.

You don’t need to tip in Italy. Italians will only leave a tip for exceptional service (anniversary dinner in a Michelin-starred restaurant) or will leave the change when paying cash because it’s easier not to wait for the waiter to make change .

  • Thinking you have to order an antipasto, primo e secondo at every meal.

Most Italians don’t eat an antipasto, primo, secondo and dolce at every meal – you don’t have to, either.

  • Not respecting meal times, especially at lunch time.

Most restaurants and bars have specific opening times, and they will close in the afternoon. If you have a late breakfast, visit museums through lunch and hope to get a bite to eat at 2pm or 3pm, you’re going to find a very limited selection.

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  • Ordering before paying, paying before ordering in a bar.

Many bars require that you get a receipt (scontrino) before ordering, especially if you see the cash register (cassa) sitting apart from where you’ll pick up the food or coffee, and you don’t see immediate table service.

  • Touching fruit & vegetables with your bare hands in a street market or supermarket.

In a supermarket you should see plastic gloves and bags near the scales or throughout the fruit/veg section. Use them. In an open-air market, you won’t see these gloves because you are not expected to handle anything yourself – the people working in the stall will do everything.

Our staff will kindly help you to learn all that you need about Italian culture. See you around!

Marcelo

Oct
19
2011
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Rome’s chocolate festival

18837_1For Rome lovers with a sweet tooth this October there will be for its second year the Rome Chocolate Fest.

It will be held in the suggestive surroundings of the Capanelle Hippodrome during three days starting October 21st. There will be a great variety of confections, different kind of articles and gadgets.

There will be plenty of entertainment with the big dance floor provided and a wide choice of music. There will also be one big stage for theme choreography and animation shows. Also throughout the festival there will be street artists, painting expositions, a game room and a baby playground.

So if your sweet tooth is craving then take a look at the festival! And don’t forget to check our website or drop us a line to get the best accomodation in Rome at the most affordable prices.

Our blogger today: Liam

Feb
11
2009
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CARNIVAL TIME IN ITALY

Our Blogger: Lorenzo

If you happen to be traveling in Italy on February, I would like to familiarize you with a festival called “Carnevale”. It is most celebrated in Venice, where it first began, but all of Italy is festive during this period. This year, Carnevale started on the 12th of January and will end on the 24th of February.

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The 19th of February is called “giovedì grasso” or “mardi gras” in other countries and it is the peak of the festival, when adults and children dress up and participate in the various activities organized throughout Italy. In Rome, where I experienced Carnevale, there are many activities such as theatre plays  and activities in the museums for the young and theme nights in the pubs and dance clubs for adults .

 carnevaleCarnevale time is mostly for children, where they wear costumes almost every day and go around the streets throwing confetti, however for adults “giovedì grasso” is a sort of Halloween where you can either dress up totally or just wear a mask. The last weekend before February the 24th is very fun with many parades organized throughout the city and towns nearby. There are many typical pastries to eat such as “frappe” and the city becomes more colorful with confetti covering the streets. This festive time is celebrated by young and old and it’s an experience I recommend to anyone traveling to Rome during this time. Information is available on internet, on the city of Rome website and posted in the various pubs and dance clubs.

To experience the carnival in Rome and get a taste of many others Italian traditions make a booking in the strategically-located Yes Hotel or Hotel des Artistes!

Dec
11
2008
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GETTING ALL ROME-ANTIC

Our Blogger: Raul

Love is in the air..

You can’t get much more romantic than Rome. The atmosphere, the great wine and the food make falling in love so easy. That’s why it’s only fitting to have a big wedding fair in the city.

Either if you are looking for a dress, a photographer or suggestions for a great wedding reception, RomaSposa is the place to go to. Last year, the fair was a great success and this year its going to be bigger and better.

It takes place in the Fiera di Roma, on the outskirts of Rome (but don’t be afraid, it’s not difficult to reach, as you’ll realize later) from January the 9th 2009 until the 11th and then again for two days from January 16th.

YouA Roman bride to be’ll find 30,000 square meters of flowers, wedding keep-sakers, male and female fashion shows, furniture, and even travel agencies to organize your honeymoon.

If you are in the city and are thinking about getting married this is a great opportunity to take a look at the Italian approach to a wedding ceremony and to get tons of ideas to make your ceremony unique and elegant. Or if you are more intrepid than that this is the perfect occasion to start organizing your wedding in the Eternal The great Roman wedding fairCity.

Reaching the Fiera di Roma is really easy if you are staying in a well-located hotel like Yes Hotel or Hotel Des Artistes. Take the blue subway line from Termini and get off at Tiburtina. From there take the train to Fiumicino Airport and get off at the station “Fiera di Roma.” Voila. Now you’re ready to plan the most important day of your life in the most beautiful city in the world.

Written by Xtine71 in: Events in Rome, Exhibitions in Rome, Fairs in Rome |
Nov
22
2008
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BOOK FAIR IN ROME

‘’Trova il tuo equilibro’’, means find your balance in Italian, while ‘’Equilibro’’ means balance, playing at the same time with the word ‘‘libro’’, which means book in Italian. This is the new slogan of an event taking place in the beautiful city of Rome.

Roman Literature

From the 5th until the 8thof December 2008, ‘’Più libri, più liberi’’ (more books, more freedom) the Roman fair will be held at the Rome Palazzo dei Congressi . Seven years ago the Lazio Region, Province and Municipality of Rome, and the Italian publishers decided to match and dedicate this fair to our unconditional friend, the book.

Mister Fabio del Giudice, who developed it, said: ‘’The fair will host this year more than 400 publishers, 200 meetings, editorial previews and international guests’’.
This year the fair welcomed around 50,000 people but in 2009 the expectations are even higher.

 

The Rome Universities of La Sapienza and Tor Vergata gave some help, aware of the fact that most books are aimed at young people. Even the youngest ones, with the traditional set dedicated to children, so they will become happy readers in the future by knowing a friendship with books from the early age.

Several spaces for professionals and foreign publishers will be provided alongside stands of their Italian colleagues for this seventh edition. If you are one of them, you may want to  stay in one of our central  hotels such as  Yes Hotel Rome.

Palazzo Congressi Rome Italy

As Fabio Del Giudice explained ‘‘often the small and medium Italian publishers cannot be known abroad and we felt this was the right way to publicize the Italian books. We also hope that the  Book Fair in Rome, the only of its kind, will become an international event. "

Tickets fee: 6 euro

Where  : Palazzo dei Congressi, Piazza John Kennedy 1, Rome

 

More Information on the official website of the Rome Book Fair.

Written by Xtine71 in: Events in Rome, Fairs in Rome |

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