Oct
23
2013
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Why not Cezanne in Rome?

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Considered a master by Matisse and Picasso, the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism and the early 20th century’s Cubism ,  Paul Cezanne’s immortal legacy will be present in Rome for what is probably one most interesting exhibitions of the Year.

The name of the event is ‘‘Cezanne and the Italian Artists of the twentieth century’’.  It takes place at the Complesso del Vittoriano, just around the corner from Piazza Venezia, at the very heart of the City Centre. Easy to reach from our location with the underground B, stop Colosseo or with the Bus 40, stop Piazza Venezia.

Here follows for you the ticket prices and admission time:

Tickets:

Individuals: 12 euro

Groups: 9 euro

Over 65 years 9 euro

Children under 6 year old free admission

Admission time and dates:

Monday to Thursday from 9:30 to 19:30;
Friday and Saturday from 9.30 to 23.30;
Sundays from 9.30 to 20.30.

The exhibition will be on until February 2nd 2014. Enjoy it !!!!

May
17
2013
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The Azaleas of the Spanish Steps

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Living in Rome is full of small joys and one of our favorites is to see the city bloom in April, as if waking up from its winter sleep.

The ritual sign that let you know officialy that spring has arrived are the Azaleas of the Spanish Steps. Every year for the last 75 years the staircase is decorated towards the end of April with flowers that contribute to the feeling of joy that pervades the city when winter is left behind.

To experience Rome during Spring, check our website to book you accommodation or send us a line: we’ll find an option that fits your budget!

Mar
14
2013
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Rome Welcomes Pope Francis

Il nuovo Papa Jorge Mario Bergoglio con il nome di Francesco I

So, we finally have a Pope.

The world was surprised to learn the election was so quick, but was even more surprised to learn that the new pope – who will go under the name Francesco, or Francis in English- was Jorge Mario Bergoglio, archbishop of Buenos Aires, who wasn’t included in any of the preliminary lists made by Vatican experts and probability whizzes at the gambling companies around the world. As the  Roman saying  goes, whoever enters the conclave as a pope, leaves as a cardinal.

With hindsight, the election of archbishop Bergoglio, who will become the first pope to arrive from outside Europe, is a smart one. An austere man who chose his papal name inspired by Saint Francis of Assisi, he is sure to bring warmth and vigour to the church he is called to lead, that without mentioning the immense reserve of devotion and support he will find in Latin America, where the majority of the population is catholic.

Next Sunday, Pope Francis will offer his first Angelus, the public blessing the pope offers every week at noon. It will be a great opportunity to be part of a historical event! If you need help with your accomodation in Rome, don’t hesitate to contact us, or check our website to get the  best rates in the Eternal City!

Mar
12
2013
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Rome: Conclave to Elect New Pope Starts Today

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Today, cardinals from all around the world will meet in Rome to elect a new leader for the catholic church.

According to the Italian media there are a couple of strong names, namely cardinal Scola from Milano and cardinal Scherer from Sao Paolo but none of them seems to be able to get the 77 votes that are necessary to reach the majority of the preferences. Specialists do not expect a quick decision but it’s almost certain that the new pope will be elected before the week ends, probably on Sunday, a possibility that the city council has already contemplated, making arrangements to move the annual city marathonf from the morning to the evening in case Sunday turns out to be the big day.

Tonight rains in Rome and there is in the air a feel of anticipation while the eyes and cameras of the world turn to the Sistine chapel waiting for the white smoke signal that will open the next chapter in the history of catholicism.

Want to witness history? check our availability on-line or send us an e-mail to book your accommodation for this memorable day.

Mar
02
2013
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THE SIGN OF THE GLORY

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Is the name of the exhibition that takes place in the Museo di Roma from 5th December, 2012 until.7th April 2013. Sketches that gave birth to immortal masterpieces will provide a genuine prospective of the creation process by the great Canova.

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) became famous for bringing back the classical elegance after the fire of baroque style with all its passionate excess cooled down a bit. His solid and graceful marble nudes are vibrant and unquestionably alive, in a radiant white full of splendour.

Opening time from 10.00 until 20.00 from Tuesday to Sunday, admission ticket is 11 euros.. For booking try Infoline: tel. +39 060608 (daily, from 9:00 to 21:00) or visit www.omniticket.it.

Museo di Roma is located in Piazza San Pantaleo, 10 near Piazza Navona. (a 15 minutes bus ride from our location). For more info info@yeshotelrome.com.

MARCELO

Feb
19
2013
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TAXI IN ROME TIPS

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By following this simple tips you may have not a story to tell about a taxi driver that has left you with a wallet excessively empty.

Before taking a cab ask our staff about how much a fair price will be for the desired destination,  which helps you to avoid unpleasant situations.

It is true that our hotel is just around the corner from Termini Station, but also half a block from Piazza Indipendenza. The point is that from Termini you pay a supplement of  2 euros more, that you save instead from the stand at Indipendenza square.

There are two airports in Rome: Fiumicino and Ciampino. There is an official rate for taxis which is from our Hotel 48 euros to Fiumicino and 30 euros to Ciampino. This price applies for a maximum of four persons and four bags.

Any trip to the historic centre should show up as Tariffa 1 on the meter. Tariffa 2 applies beyond the Grande Raccordo Annulare and it is charged at a higher rate. Make sure that the driver has set the right Tariffa while traveling to the Roman centre.

Rome taxi drivers prefer to use taxi stands. You might be able to flag a taxi down, but it is a rarer occurence than in most cities. Romans know they’ll find a taxi stand in all the major piazze.

Official cabs are white, have a taxi sign mounted on the roof, have an insignia on the driver’s door reading “Comune di Roma,” have an official number and a meter. You want an official cab. Do not use the touts at Termini Station.

The meter starts at different rates depending on the day and time, as it follows:

Monday –Saturday from 7am- 10pm the meter starts at €2,80

Sundays and Holidays the meter starts at €4,00

Night fares from 10pm-7am, the meter starts at €5,80

Supplement from Termini Station plus 2 euros.

* Each piece of luggage with the following dimensions cost (cm 35×25x50) €1,00 each..

If you feel you have been cheated by a taxi, the driver’s license number is written on a metal plate on the left door on the passenger side. Make sure you get a receipt or ricevuta and write down the name and number printed on the plate. In addition, you should also take note of which cab company you used .With this information, you can file a complaint with the cab company and should be able to receive reimbursement.

And remember that our staff will assist you with all the information you may need. See you soon.

MARCELO

Jan
17
2013
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When Visiting Italy (some common mistakes)

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Every country is different, here are some tips that will help you to have a more enjoyable experience in Italy:

  • Assuming you can buy tickets for public transportation directly on the bus / tram.

Most big cities in Italy (Rome, Milan, Naples, Florence) require you to buy your bus/tram tickets before boarding. And not just that, but most bus stops will not have a ticket machine next to the stop. Rather, you’ll need to find a newspaper stand (edicola) or a tobacco shop (tabaccaio) to purchase your tickets.

  • No validating train tickets

Depending on the type of train ticket you buy, you may need to validate it or otherwise you pay a fine. This will be indicated on the ticket.

  • Assuming that cars and scooters will leave you to go first while crossing the streets

Even when they are bounded to, many drivers will not stop to let you go first and scooters will never do it (they have no obligation).

  • Expecting to be waited on very attentively in a restaurant or store.

Many restaurants will be “understaffed,” (few waiters working many tables) They probably won’t ask “how are you folks doing?”, if you like the food, if you want a refill (this concept doesn’t exist) or other general “friendly” requests that are in reality superfluous to your main dining experience – they just don’t have the time. So, sit back, be patient, and flag down your waiter when you need something, but be patient in knowing they are probably working very hard.

  • Tipping.

You don’t need to tip in Italy. Italians will only leave a tip for exceptional service (anniversary dinner in a Michelin-starred restaurant) or will leave the change when paying cash because it’s easier not to wait for the waiter to make change .

  • Thinking you have to order an antipasto, primo e secondo at every meal.

Most Italians don’t eat an antipasto, primo, secondo and dolce at every meal – you don’t have to, either.

  • Not respecting meal times, especially at lunch time.

Most restaurants and bars have specific opening times, and they will close in the afternoon. If you have a late breakfast, visit museums through lunch and hope to get a bite to eat at 2pm or 3pm, you’re going to find a very limited selection.

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  • Ordering before paying, paying before ordering in a bar.

Many bars require that you get a receipt (scontrino) before ordering, especially if you see the cash register (cassa) sitting apart from where you’ll pick up the food or coffee, and you don’t see immediate table service.

  • Touching fruit & vegetables with your bare hands in a street market or supermarket.

In a supermarket you should see plastic gloves and bags near the scales or throughout the fruit/veg section. Use them. In an open-air market, you won’t see these gloves because you are not expected to handle anything yourself – the people working in the stall will do everything.

Our staff will kindly help you to learn all that you need about Italian culture. See you around!

Marcelo

Jan
05
2013
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Become a Gladiator in Rome!!!

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The most exciting experience, that will take you back in time not only to understand a very special aspect of daily life in Ancient Rome, but to feel it in a unique way. The Gladiator School in Rome run by the Gruppo Storico Romano (enthusiastic volunteers willing to tell you everything they know about Rome) provides this opportunity.

First a  history lesson: weapons, costumes and models from Ancient Rome. Then, the gladiator style warm up (dressed in a kind of toga) with belt, sandals and a wooden training sword called a ‘rudis’. The rest of the time at gladiator school is about learning different techniques of attack and defence using your wooden sword. When you’ve proved yourself with that, you’ll move on to use the ‘gladius’, the heavier sword which gave gladiators their name

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The activity is good for both adults and kids (thou for children over 6 years old). The price depends on the size of the group that makes the booking. The school is located at Via Appia Antica 18, which is just a short cab ride from the Coliseum and a wonderful complement to its visit.

I came to know about it for clients that tried it and found it the most interesting and funny! ( So now  I have to try it myself,  maybe I will see you there. Why not?)

MARCELO

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